COES
Racial phenotypicality bias in educational expectations for both male and female teenagers from different socioeconomic backgrounds
Revista Académica
Año de Publicación: 2017

Among South American Hispanics, it is common to refer to one another in terms of external appearance. Terms like ‘flaco’ (skinny man), ‘vieja’ (old woman), ‘moreno’ (dark man), ‘negrita’ (black woman), among others, are frequently used in day-to-day life. Although in some cases these terms are used derogatorily, most often they serve humoristic and even affectionate purposes. Of special interest, here are the references to the ‘whiteness’ of someone’s skin tone and facial features, which tends to be a marker for the societally idealized Caucasian origin (Waldman, 2004).

Autores COES:
Otros Autores: Meeus, J.; Paredes, J.; Brown, R.; Manzi, J.
Medio de publicación: European Journal of Social Psychology
Como citar: Meeus, J., Paredes, J., González, R., Brown, R., & Manzi, J. (2017)- Racial phenotypicality bias in educational expectations for both male and female teenagers from different socioeconomic backgrounds. European Journal of Social Psychology. Disponible en DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.2247

(Disponible solo en inglés) In three experiments (N?=?56, 99, and 225), we showed that racial phenotypicality bias characterizes educational expectations for Chilean mestizo students: participants displayed more positive educational expectations for light complexioned than for dark complexioned high school students. In Study 1, with male high school target students, the relation between racial phenotypic appearance and educational expectations was mediated by differences in perceived competence. Study 2 suggests that the gender of the target student did not influence the occurrence of racial phenotypicality bias. Study 3 showed that racial phenotypicality bias occurs in both university students and high school teachers' judgements. Although socioeconomic background of the target student partially explained the effects of racial phenotypic appearance (especially in teachers), the latter exerted an additional and independent influence on educational expectations. These results underline the fact that effects of racial phenotypicality bias should not be overlooked in the educational domain. As mediational analyses suggested, these effects only partly occur because of stereotypical associations between racial phenotypic appearance and socioeconomic background, but also because of stereotypical associations between racial phenotypic appearance and attributed competence.