COES
Political consequences of socio-territorial conflicts. Conceptualizing changing paths of citizenship and democratic governance in the Andean Region of Latin America
Capítulo de libro
Autores COES:
Otros Editores: Costa Lobo, M., Carreira da Silva, F. & Zúquete, J.

Social conflict impinges on political systems and their dynamics in different ways. It has been studied by the theory of social movements, but only recently has it received more attention from researchers, previously more focused on its origins and dynamics. This chapter analyses socio-territorial conflicts — a type of conflict that is on the rise in countries in the Andean Region of Latin America. We suggest that socio-territorial conflicts have generated a different type of political outcome that has enabled citizen sectors formerly excluded from political expression to become increasingly visible. Until now, political outcomes have been considered to derive mainly from urban conflicts and have not normally been associated with socio-territorial conflicts. In turn, political expression had been the exclusive province of political parties and national organizations. However, things have changed in the new scenario of democratic governance, loss of State power and capacity, and neoliberal internationalization of the Latin American economies. The frontiers of “extractivism” in the Andean Region have expanded; socio territorial conflicts have spread all over the region; and the nature of the relation between social actors, politics, and the State is changing. In ways that are different from the past, local affairs now have political consequences, expanding the frontiers of citizenship and incorporating new social actors.

Como citar: Delamaza, Gonzalo. (2018). Political consequences of socio-territorial conflicts. Conceptualizing changing paths of citizenship and democratic governance in the Andean Region of Latin America. En Costa Lobo, M., Carreira da Silva, F. & Zúquete, J. (Eds.) Chaning Societies: Legacies and Challenges. Citizenship in crisis. Vol II. Lisboa: Imprensa de Ciências Sociais